Je ne Regrette Rien  
Graham Hudson's practice involves a variety of mediums, and an ever-evolving array of materials. With sculpture as its core, Hudson's work speaks of the Information age, with tongue firmly in cheek. His work has the recurring stance of the serious-joke, where theme is undermined by method, and materials are juxtaposed to meaning.

Addressing subjects including ideology, historical and everyday conflict, advertising, media, and the nature of the art object, his concerns range from the moral and political, to the aesthetic and the common-place. Hudson's materials come from the streets, skips, toy-shops, e-bay, and the B&Q value range. His pound-store plastics and broken furnishings are veneered, back-lit, cable-tied together and promoted to an idolatry status.

Hudson's 2005 sculptures, Side A and Side B and Je ne regrette rien, or we'll meet again staged at Rokeby, combined previously separate elements in his practice. Namely the gigantism, raw construction, and site-specific nature of works like the Challenger Tank (2004 and 1999), with the live, un-scripted nature of his performance works and audio installations, such as TV Musical Western War (2004). These new works reference the narrative construction of History painting, a genre employed as the figurehead of religious and political ambition, with a nod and a wink, Hudson's pieces could be said to reflect the new Imperialism - globalization. As with all of Hudson's work the authoritative posture of these works is rendered absurd through the choice and placement of the materials.
 
Recent works include elements of fans, fountains and rotating signs, as well as recurring motifs such as turntables and off-cuts. These give us a taste of the ephemeral, presenting ever changing audio scores, twisting cables, and light bulbs with a life of there own; offering a lyrical beauty that encourages the romantic in us all. However visually pleasing, the work nevertheless nods to the inherent irony of such a stance in this day and age. Can romantic sincerity also contain an intellectual critique?

Hudson has received awards from Deutsche Bank and the British Council, in 2004 he was awarded a Jerwood Artist Platform solo show in London, and in 2005 he had solo shows at VTO, London and Rokeby, London. Recent group shows have included Brit Povera, Krinzinger, Vienna. Collage, Bloomberg SPACE, London, England their England Laden Fuer Nichts, Leipzig, Larry's Cocktails, Gagosian, London, and Acid Rain, Glassbox Paris. In 2006 Hudson will be a Henry Moore Fellow at Chelsea College of Art and Design on Milbank. Forthcoming solo shows include Zinger Presents (Tilburg, Netherlands) Mark Moore (Los Angeles) and Monitor (Rome)
Hudson lives and works in London, and is represented by Rokeby.